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School Psychologists

Significant Points

School Psychologists need an educational specialist (Ed.S) degree.
School Psychologists practice as practitioners in psychological services.
In some states, they can obtain credential as “Licensed Educational Psychologist” or similar and provide private/outside services to children/families in private practice/agency settings.

Nature of the work/Job Descriptions

School psychologists work to find the best solution for each student and situation and use different strategies to address student needs and improve school and district-wide support systems. School psychologists provide leadership in initiating and facilitating constructive change in accordance with best practices by providing services in the following areas: consultation, prevention, intervention, evaluation, and research/planning/training.

Working Conditions

School Psychologists may work the traditional 9 to 10-month school year; some are employed on 11-month or full-year contracts. They usually work the same hours as teachers.

Training, Other Qualifications, and Advancement

Masters degree +/ Ed.S required in NV Schools; Ed.D. Or Ph.D. is preferred.
National Association of School Psychologists award the Nationally Certified School Psychologist (NCSP) award; completion of 60 graduate semester hours in school psychology; a 1,200-hour internship, 600 hours of which must be completed in a school setting; and a passing score on the National School Psychology Examination.

Employment

School Psychologists work in Early Childhood Programs, Elementary, Middle and High Schools

Job Outlook

Employment of psychologists is expected to grow 12 percent from 2008 to 2018, about as fast as the average for all occupations.

Earnings

Nationally, median annual earnings in May 2013 were $71,840
Some Nevada School Psychologists are on a certified salary schedule, plus additional paid days (e.g. +10 days); others are on a “pro tech” salary schedule

Sources of Additional Information

National Association of School Psychologists: www.nasponline.org

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School Physical Therapist

Significant Points

Doctorate or professional degree (Master’s degree) needed to obtain license
After graduating from an accredited physical therapist educational program, therapists must pass a licensure exam before they can practice.

Nature of the work/Job Descriptions

Provide appropriate services to assist with the student’s ability to access their physical environment. Areas include positioning, mobility and safe access to the school, and sensory motor.

Working Conditions

School Physical Therapists (PT’s) may work the traditional 9 to 10-month school year; some are employed on 11-month or full-year contracts.

Training, Other Qualifications, and Advancement

All states require physical therapists to pass a licensure exam before they can practice, after graduating from an accredited physical therapist educational program.
Master degree (MA/MS) or doctorate needed to obtain license. Many states require continuing education as a condition of maintaining licensure.

Employment

School Physical Therapists work in Early Childhood programs, Elementary, Middle and High Schools; most hold itinerant positions

Job Outlook

Employment of physical therapists is expected to grow by 30 percent from 2008 to 2018, much faster than the average for all occupations. Job opportunities will be good for licensed physical therapists in all settings.

Earnings

Nationally, median annual earnings of physical therapists in May 2013 were $72,330

Sources of Additional Information

American Physical Therapy Association: www.apta.org
School Based Physical Therapy (Special Interest Group): www.pediatricapta.org

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School Educational Audiologist

Significant Points

A master’s degree or a clinical doctorate (Au.D.) in audiology is the standard credential required for licensing in most States to work in private, health care facilities. As of 2007, the Au.D. has become the entry-level degree for the clinical practice of audiology. Licensure or certification requirements also exist, but vary by State. Job opportunities are expected to be favorable.

Nature of the work/Job Descriptions

Educational Audiologists specialize in the effects of hearing and listening deficits on the ability of children and youth to access communication and learning. Typical responsibilities include hearing screenings, assessment, amplification, habilitation, counseling, prevention, and classroom acoustics.

Working Conditions

Educational Audiologists may work the traditional 9 to 10-month school year; some are employed on 11-month or full-year contracts. They usually work the same hours as teachers.

Training, Other Qualifications, and Advancement

Nevada school districts require a Masters level or higher for licensure. The American Speech-Language-Hearing Association (ASHA) awards the Certificate of Clinical Competence in Audiology (CCC-A); completion of master’s degree or clinical doctorate (Au.D.) in audiology from an accredited university/college and pass the Praxis Series examination in audiology administered by the Educational Testing Service (ETS) are some of the requirements for the CCC-A.

Employment

Educational Audiologists consult and provide services to Early Childhood Programs, Elementary, Middle and High Schools. Most work in diagnostic centers.

Job Outlook

Employment of Educational Audiologists is expected to grow by 19 percent from 2008 to 2018, faster than the average for all occupations. Job opportunities are expected to be favorable.

Earnings

Nationally, median annual earnings in May 2013 was $69,220. Nevada Educational Audiologists are on a certified salary schedule.

Sources of Additional Information

American Speech-Language and Hearing Association: www.asha.org
Educational Audiology Association: www.edaud.org

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School Occupational Therapist

Significant Points

Master’s degree is required to practice the profession.
A National Certification examination and National Certification Registration are also required

Nature of the work/Job Descriptions

Provide appropriate services to assist with the student’s ability to access their given educational environment. Areas include: self-help, sensory motor, fine motor, and pre-vocational. They evaluate children\'s capabilities, recommend and provide therapy, modify classroom equipment, and help children participate in school activities.

Working Conditions

School Occupational Therapists (OT’s) may work the traditional 9 to 10-month school year; some are employed on 11-month or full-year contracts.
They usually work the same hours as teachers; some work part-time

Training, Other Qualifications, and Advancement

A Master’s degree or higher is the minimum educational requirement
To obtain a license, applicants much graduate from an accredited educational program and pass a national certification examination. Those who pass the national exam are awarded the title of “Occupational Therapist Registered (OTR).”
Nevada requires a State License as well

Employment

School Occupational Therapists work in Early Childhood programs, Elementary, Middle and High Schools; most hold itinerant positions

Job Outlook

Employment of occupational therapists is expected to increase by 26 percent between 2008 and 2018, much faster than the average for all occupations.

Earnings

Nationally, median annual earnings for occupational therapists in May 2013 were $69,390

Sources of Additional Information

American Occupational Therapy Association: www.aota.org

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School Nurse

Significant Points

Registered nurses (RN’s) are projected to create the second largest number of new jobs among all occupations
School Nurse requires a BSN (Bachelor of Science in Nursing) and to be an RN (Registered Nurse)

Nature of the work/Job Descriptions

Case management and coordination of health services (i.e. Diabetes care) of students with special health care needs; supervision of unlicensed school staff in the delivery of nursing services to students; participation in school assistance teams; and some hands-on procedures for medically fragile students

Working Conditions

School Nurses may work the traditional 9 to 10-month school year; some are employed on 11-month or full-year contracts.
They usually work the same hours as teachers

Training, Other Qualifications, and Advancement

In all States and the District of Columbia, students must graduate from an approved nursing program and pass a national licensing examination in order to obtain a nursing license.
BSN programs, offered by colleges and universities, take about 4 years to complete.
School nurse requires Board of Education Certification; or Substitute School Nurse requires an R.N., and BSN

Employment

School Nurses work in Early Childhood Programs, Elementary, Middle and High Schools

Job Outlook

Employment of registered nurses is expected to grow by 22 percent from 2008 to 2018, much faster than the average for all occupations. Overall job opportunities for registered nurses are expected to be excellent, but may vary by employment and geographic setting.

Earnings

Nationally, median annual earnings for RN’s in May 2013 were $54,660

Sources of Additional Information

National Association of School Nurses: www.nasn.org

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School Counselor

Significant Points

School Counselors much be certified
Minimum of a Masters Degree is required

Nature of the work/Job Descriptions

School counselors help all students in the areas of academic achievement; personal/social development and career development, ensuring today’s students become the productive, well-adjusted adults of tomorrow.

Working Conditions

School Counselors may work the traditional 9 to 10-month school year; some are employed on 11-month or full-year contracts.
They usually work the same hours as teachers

Training, Other Qualifications, and Advancement

All states require school counselors to hold a state school counseling certification and to have completed at least some graduate course work. A master’s degree usually is required to be licensed or certified as a counselor.

Employment

School Counselors work in Early Childhood programs, Elementary, Middle and High Schools

Job Outlook

Overall employment of school counselors is expected to increase by 14 percent between 2008 and 2018, which is faster than the average for all occupations. Projected growth is expected to vary by specialty. Job opportunities should be favorable because job openings are expected to exceed the number of graduates from counseling programs, especially in rural areas.

Earnings

Nationally, median annual earnings in May 2013 was $63,100

Sources of Additional Information

American School Counselor Association: www.schoolcounselor.org

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School Speech-Language Pathologist

Significant Points

A master’s degree in speech-language pathology is the standard required for licensing in most states and is the most common level of education among speech-language pathologists. Licensure or certification requirements also exist, but vary by state.

Nature of the work/Job Descriptions

School Speech-Language Pathologists (SLP’s) identify, assess and facilitate the remediation of communication disorders that hinder school success. These include disorders related to speech, language, cognitive-communication, voice, swallowing, and fluency.

Working Conditions

School SLP’s may work the traditional 9 to 10-month school year; some are employed on 11-month or full-year contracts. They usually work the same hours as teachers.

Training, Other Qualifications, and Advancement

Nevada school districts, bachelor level is the minimal requirement for license; Masters Level preferred
Some states issuing a teaching license or certificate require a master’s degree from an accredited college or university.
American Speech-Language-Hearing Association (ASHA) awards the Certificate of Clinical Competence (CCC); completion of master’s degree in speech pathology from an accredited university/college and 400 hours of supervised clinical experience, complete a 36-week postgraduate clinical fellowship, and pass the Praxis Series examination in speech-language pathology administered by the Educational Testing Service (ETS).

Employment

School SLP’s work in Early Childhood Programs, Elementary, Middle and High Schools; most hold itinerant positions

Job Outlook

Employment of speech-language pathologists is expected to grow by 19 percent from 2008 to 2018, faster than the average for all occupations. Job opportunities are expected to be favorable.

Earnings

Nationally, median annual earnings in May 2008 were $66,490

Sources of Additional Information

American Speech-Language and Hearing Association: www.asha.org

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School Special Education Teacher

Significant Points

Bachelor level required for license.
Must meet “Highly Qualified” status for certain schools

Nature of the work/Job Descriptions

Special education teachers work with children and youths who have a variety of disabilities. Provide case management of students with Individualized Education Programs (IEP’s) including collaboration and consultation with related service personnel, general educators, administrators, paraprofessionals, and appropriate community agencies, as well as individual education supports in a various educational environments, and other supports as determined by the IEP team.

Working Conditions

Special Education Teachers may work the traditional 9 to 10-month school year; some are employed on 11-month or full-year contracts. They usually work the same hours as teachers

Training, Other Qualifications, and Advancement

A Bachelor degree is required for license
All states require Special Education Teachers to be licensed; some states offer general special education licenses across a variety of disability categories; others license several different specialties within special education; some special education teachers receive a general education credential to teach K-12; then train in a specialty (e.g. learning disabilities, behavioral disorders)

Employment

Special Education Teachers work in Early Childhood programs, Elementary, Middle and High Schools; working as early childhood teachers, resource teachers or in full inclusion programs

Job Outlook

The number of special education teachers is expected to increase by 17 percent from 2008 to 2018, which is faster than the average for all occupations. Job prospects should be excellent because many districts report problems finding adequate numbers of licensed special education teachers.

Earnings

Nationally, median annual earnings in May 2013 were $58,400

Sources of Additional Information

The Council for Exceptional Children: www.cec.sped.org
Personnel Improvement Center: www.personnelcenter.org

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